MASTERING A CAREER IN ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

Support from Lantra’s Women and Work award has not just helped environmentalist Annabel Foskett embark upon a masters degree. It’s also led to a sought-after scholarship and landed her as the Women and Work Environmental Conservation joint-winner of the year. Since 2006, the Women and Work programme has worked with over 1212 companies in England to support 3,250 women develop their skills and progress their careers in industries where women are under-represented. To celebrate the end of the 2010/2011 training programme, the nine top learners were recognised at the second annual Lantra Women and Work Awards, sponsored by VectorWorks Training, at Nailcote Hall, Warwickshire, on 30 March 2011. Last summer Annabel made the bold decision to end a long-term contract with a client and go back to her studies. The 37-year-old environmental education consultant from North London enrolled with Hertfordshire University to study for a Masters in Environmental Management. “I’d been told about Lantra’s Women and Work award and applied for it. It was great getting the grant because it has not only helped fund a small part of my degree but it also gave me great encouragement in actually going back to study.” Annabel’s enthusiasm for her environmental work also netted further success when she was recently selected from more than 11,000 applicants for the Vodafone World Difference scholarship. The funding, which went to 500 people, has afforded Annabel a two-month conservation work placement. It is with a view to her own longer-term career that Annabel decided to undertake the masters degree and broaden her skills in the environmental management and conservation industry. “I want to extend my knowledge of environmental management work and not just specialise in the education side of conservation work,” she says. It’s in part thanks to her now 13-year-old son Leonardo, that Annabel’s conservation career ever got off the ground. Having gained an NVQ level 2 in Amenity Horticulture Garden Design eight years ago Annabel started to help out at her son’s primary school on ad hoc nature projects. “As it does, one thing led to another and I started to work with the children on energy conservation and habitat projects,” she says, “it’s been non-stop since then.” For the last five years Annabel has been working as a self-employed environment educational consultant with clients including Barnet Countryside Centre, Veolia Water Educational Services and primary schools. Beside her consultancy work Annabel volunteers as an Eco Schools, Green Flag School assessor, is a school governor, a London in Bloom, school grounds judge, a fundraiser and charity worker for Community Development in Africa, an RSPB youth and education volunteer and a founder and chair of the Friends of Cromer Road School. “Once I’ve completed my degree I want my work to have a strong community focus and for it to show a direct benefit to people and the environment around them,” she says. “After making my decision last summer it was a huge benefit to me getting both the Lantra award and then the Vodafone scholarship. They’ve opened up new and exciting opportunities.” Lyndsay Bird, Lantra Women and Work Programme Manager said, “Annabel has really taken on the spirit of this programme. It is very inspiring to see the heights that her career has already taken, and no doubt this is just the beginning for her.” The Lantra Women and Work funding programme will commence in June 2011 (subject to contract). For more information and to register your interest visit www.lantra.co.uk/Women-and-Work. Follow Lantra on twitter at www.twitter.com/LantraSSC. ENDS ISSUED BY Lantra Press Office Samuel Zelmer-Jackson, PR Co-ordinator Tel: 02476 858 418 or email media@lantra.co.uk Follow Lantra on Twitter at www.twitter.com/LantraSSC CREDIT FOR PHOTO Annabel Foskett – Lantra’s Women and Work Environmental Conservation Joint Award Winner 2010/11 NOTES TO EDITOR About Women and Work • The Women and Work: Sector Pathways Initiative is about raising skills and unlocking potential. The project aims to raise recruitment levels in sectors where women are under-represented; increasing earning potential and aiding career progression. The initiative is in response to recommendations by the Women and Work Commission’s report ‘Shaping a Fairer Future’ and receives government funding, matched by employer contributions. • Women and Work funding is available to those working in agriculture, aquaculture, environmental conservation, farriery, fencing, fisheries management, game and wildlife, horticulture, landscaping and sports turf, production horticulture, land-based engineering and trees and timber. • For more information: www.lantra.co.uk/women-and-work/ About Lantra • Lantra is the Sector Skills Council for land-based and environmental industries, working to ensure these businesses access the training, qualifications, skills and knowledge they need. • Lantra represents 17 industries: agricultural livestock and crops; animal care; animal technology; aquaculture; environmental conservation; equine; farriery; fencing; fisheries management; floristry; game and wildlife management; land-based engineering; horticulture, landscaping and sports turf; production horticulture; trees and timber and veterinary activities. • By working together with the sector, Lantra leads research on skills issues and business needs, sets national standards and develops qualifications to meet modern business needs and help businesses grow through skills. • For more information see www.lantra.co.uk.

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