Raising Money The Hard Way For The Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust

Fundrsisers Dave Meekin and Mark Latimer triumphed at the notoriously torturous Hellrunner Trial recently – taking fundraising in aid of the Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust (SDBTT)  to a whole new energy sapping level.

Fundrsisers Dave Meekin and Mark Latimer triumphed at the notoriously torturous Hellrunner Trial recently – taking fundraising in aid of the Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust (SDBTT)  to a whole new energy sapping level.

Dave and Mark took on the 'Hills of Hell' and the 'Bogs of Doom' in the race which is trail running at its toughest.  The course took them through more than 11 miles of calf burning hills and energy sapping bogs. Through their brave and dedicated efforts Dave and Mark have raised £255 for the SDBTT (the biggest brain tumour charity in the UK).

Dave said, “The Hellrunner was incredibly tough but we both finished in good times and good spirits encouraged on by the crowds and the fundraising we had done for SDBTT!”

Paul Carbury, CEO of the charity, said: ‘We are so grateful to those people who take time out of their lives to raise funds for The Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust.  Our fundraising efforts support vital research which helps the medical profession shape their understanding of this devastating and complex disease. In 2009, we funded a record £1m of research and our projects were responsible for announcing a range of significant breakthroughs.  It’s thanks to the support we receive from the general public that we can continue to do this.”

Paul Johnson
Loop PR
01252 725 346

About Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust (SDBTT)

Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust is the leading adult and childhood brain tumour charity dedicated to research in the UK. The charity’s aim is to raise awareness, support and funds for brain tumour research to help fight this devastating disease and give hope to brain tumour patients in the future. It also offers support and information to patients and their carers.

The charity has been working to find a cure for brain tumours since it was set up in 1996 by Samantha’s parents, Neil and Angela Dickson.  Since then millions of pounds have been raised for brain tumour research and support services for patients and carers, and the charity has become the largest dedicated funder of brain tumour research in the UK.

More information on Samantha Dickson Brain Tumour Trust is available by calling 0845 130 9733 or visiting www.braintumourtrust.co.uk

General Statistics

 

Out of the £420million spent on cancer research in the UK per year, less than 1% is spent on brain tumour research.

6,500 people are diagnosed each year with a primary brain tumour.

3,400 people lose their lives to a brain tumour each year.

Despite being the biggest childhood cancer killer and causing more deaths among the under 40s than any other cancer statistics show that brain cancer has received only a fraction of the funding of higher profile cancers. Statistics also show that high profile cancers have received up to 20 times the investment of brain cancer and have seen survival rates almost double in 30 years.

Often dubbed the ‘forgotten cancer’, the UK’s brain cancer survival rates have barely changed in 30 years whereas other cancer types have seen clear improvements.

Brain tumours cause the greatest reduction in life expectancy of any cancer - at over 20 years of life lost on average - and are the biggest killer of adults under 40.

People affected by brain tumours can suffer long-term adverse effects as a result of the tumour and treatment they receive – this adds 12,000 disabled life years in the UK each year.

SDBTT Statistics

 

Record year from 1st April 2008 – 31st March 2009

 

Record income of £1.3m for the year

Record research expenditure of £1m

Three major research breakthroughs:

University of Newcastle – our research team have pinpointed characteristics of medulloblastoma tumours that could help to determine the severity of an individual child’s cancer. A new project is now trialling a UK-wide system for testing tumour samples and will assess whether this could be used routinely to improve diagnosis and tailor treatment for individual patients.

Queen Mary University, London – our research team has made a major breakthrough with regard to the childhood brain tumour pilocytic astrocytoma. Research has identified certain genetic changes that are frequently found in these tumours, and which relate to a pathway that is likely to be involved in the development of the tumour.

 

National Hospital University College London – for the first time in the UK adult high grade brain tumour patients are having a chromosome test on their tumour samples. The test identifies approximately one in three patients whose tumour is far more reactive to chemotherapy

6,500 people are diagnosed each year with a primary brain tumour.

3,400 people lose their lives to a brain tumour each year.

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