Bad Faith Lawsuit Leads to $3.4 Million Award


A Kentucky man has been awarded $3.4 million following an unfair insurance denial lawsuit that alleged the Indiana Insurance Company violated its contract and acted in  bad faith .

James Demetre alleged in the  bad faith lawsuit  that the insurance company violated the Kentucky Unfair Claims Settlement Practices Act, the Kentucky Consumer Protection Act, and breached the contract it had signed with him when it said it had not responsibility to cover a legitimate claim that had been filed.

Demetre was sued by a family living near his property, which used to house a gas station, that claimed petroleum fumes from it were coming into their home. Claiming  personal injuries  and property damage, the lawsuit asked for $10 million in damages from Demetre, a local FOX affiliate  reported .

In order to combat the claim, Demetre turned to Indiana Insurance to handle the claim. However, the insurance company ruled that it had no responsibility to cover the policy he had taken out with it, or even defend him. Because of this, Demetre launched a bad faith lawsuit against the company claiming breach of contract.

Following more than three years of legal battles, Demetre was awarded $925,000 in compensatory damages and $2.5 million in punitive damages by a Campbell County Circuit Court.

If you or a loved one has been the victim of an  unfair insurance denial  by an insurance company, there may be legal options at your disposal. Call Sokolove Law today to learn more about pursuing a bad faith lawsuit.

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