Neighborhood node and stormwater management in a parking space

In conjunction with a seminar about green retrofits, the architecture firm Tengbom transformed a parking space on Katarinavägen in Stockholm into a public meeting place. The project is an important example of climate-smart uses for our urban environment. The conversion of parking spaces to community nodes with ecosystem services may be closer than we think. 

At a seminar last week, Tengbom talked about green retrofits – strategies for refurbishing grey infrastructure into green infrastructure and what this can mean for public space. Combining goals for sustainable stormwater management, the creation of public space, and high biodiversity can generate pleasant meeting places along our streets and add ecosystem services to our cities. Stormwater that would otherwise be released into ageing sewers combined with vegetation means new habitats for people, birds, and insects. Green retrofits integrate social aspects with ecological aspects – and the city stands to gain financially.

- Sweden has fallen behind when it comes to this type of sustainable thinking. We feel that micro parks such as this are easily adaptable to the city of Stockholm and we would be happy to implement more pilot projects, says Fredrik Legeby, Urban Planner at Tengbom.

There are several reasons why our street environments may soon change. Attitudes and habits related to car use are shifting, as seen in the increase of bike and car share systems and car-to-go services. Meanwhile, technical development towards smaller, self-driving cars is making fast progress. Fewer and smaller vehicles will shrink transport requirements for our cities which will in turn reduce the need for parking spaces.

- Many people are currently unaware that a large portion of Stockholm still has a combined sewer system--which means wastewater is released directly into Lake Mälaren during periods of heavy rain. Tengbom’s parklet will, as far as I know, be the first in the world to demonstrate how stormwater management can be integrated into these small spaces, says Shira Jacobs, Landscape Architect at Tengbom.

A parklet is a temporary or permanent sidewalk extension that provides more space and amenities for people using the street. Parklets are usually installed on parking lanes and use one or more parking spaces. Launched in San Francisco, California, in 2010, the phenomenon has now spread all over the world. Following San Francisco’s lead, several cities have produced parklet manuals that streamline the application and permitting process.

For more information, please contact:
Shira Jacobs, Landscape Architect, Tengbom
shira.jacobs@tengbom.se
+46 8 412 52 79

Emelie Mannheimer, Marketing and Communications Director, Tengbom
emelie.mannheimer@tengbom.se
+46 70 715 63 90

Press photographs:
http://news.cision.com/tengbom

Tengbom is one of the leading architectural firms in the Nordic region. The company stands for forward-looking and living architecture with buildings and milieus that people want to visit and in which they want to live and work. Tengbom has some 550 employees at twelve offices in Sweden and Finland. Tengbom was founded in 1906 by Ivar Tengbom, a prominent figure in Swedish architecture.

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Tengbom is one of the leading architectural firms in the Nordic region. The company stands for forward-looking and living architecture with buildings and milieus that people want to visit and in which they want to live and work. Tengbom has some 550 employees spread over about ten offices. Tengbom was founded in 1906 by Ivar Tengbom, a prominent figure in Swedish architecture. In February 2016 we were ranked the fourth most innovative architectural practice in the world, by Fast Company. Read more at www.tengbom.se.

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Sweden has fallen behind when it comes to this type of sustainable thinking. We feel that micro parks such as this are easily adaptable to the city of Stockholm and we would be happy to implement more pilot projects.
Fredrik Legeby, Urban Planner at Tengbom
Many people are currently unaware that a large portion of Stockholm still has a combined sewer system--which means wastewater is released directly into Lake Mälaren during periods of heavy rain. Tengbom’s parklet will, as far as I know, be the first in the world to demonstrate how stormwater management can be integrated into these small spaces.
Shira Jacobs, Landscape Architect at Tengbom