Statement on the House vote to repeal Obamacare by the Health Care Compact Alliance

The House of Representatives vote to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act inevitably raises the question “how do opponents propose to replace it?”

Governors of the seven states who have signed Health Care Compact legislation have already answered that question.

The Health Care Compact returns authority over health care to the states. States would be free to choose different solutions that best suit them. Massachusetts could require residents and businesses to purchase private insurance, while Vermont could opt for a single-payer program, and Texas could choose a market-based system.

Returning health care spending and policy details to the states solves the larger problem that has bedeviled the system. Our health care problems cannot be solved as long as decisions about them are made by politicians and bureaucrats at the federal level in Washington, D.C.

We must fix the governance problem of “who decides” before we can fix the policy problem of “what is decided.” The Health Care Compact addresses the governance problem by returning authority over health care to the states. Indiana, South Carolina, Utah, Georgia, Texas, Missouri and Oklahoma have already adopted the Health Care Compact.

Congress and candidates that promise to repeal and replace Obamacare have an obligation to respect the federalist structure and dispersed authority embodied in the Constitution. A clear alternative to the current centralized health care system has already been adopted by seven states. The House has voted to repeal Obamacare. The way to replace it is the Health Care Compact.

- Eric O’Keefe, Chairman, Health Care Compact Alliance

Contact: Curtis Ellis 917.861.2233 curtiswellis@gmail.com

The Health Care Compact Alliance is a non-partisan section 501(c)(4) organization providing tools that enable citizens to exert greater control over their government. The Health Care Compact was developed to offer Americans more influence over decisions that govern health care.

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Quotes

Congress and candidates that promise to repeal and replace Obamacare have an obligation to respect the federalist structure and dispersed authority embodied in the Constitution. A clear alternative to the current centralized health care system has already been adopted by seven states.
Eric O’Keefe, Chairman, Health Care Compact Alliance