Exposure to diesel exhaust at workplaces should be reduced

Press release, 14th June 2016, Helsinki, Finland

Workers are exposed to diesel exhaust in many workplaces. More attention should be paid to monitoring and reducing this exposure. Studies have linked high, repeated exposure to diesel exhaust to an increased risk of lung cancer. 

In Finland, about 50 000 workers are exposed to diesel exhaust at work. Exposure can be significant in, for example, mines, tunnel work, factories, warehouses, and terminals in which diesel machines are used.

Diesel exhaust irritates the eyes and airways, and can affect the functioning of the lungs. Research has found high, repeated exposure to diesel exhaust to be connected to an increased risk of lung cancer. It has also been suggested that this exposure may affect the heart and circulatory systems. These are the findings of a review on the health effects of diesel exhaust recently published by specialists at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) and a Nordic and Dutch specialist group.

“Exposure to exhaust fumes at workplaces is too often neglected,” says Senior Specialist Tiina Santonen of FIOH. “Attention should be paid to the monitoring and management of exposure, especially in mines and tunnel worksites in which concentrations can reach very high levels.”

The review of the health effects of diesel exhaust by FIOH’s specialists, in collaboration with the Nordic Expert Group for Criteria Documentation of Health Risks from Chemicals, NEG and the Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Safety, DECOS was published on 27.5.2016.

Various methods for reducing exposure

The emissions from diesel engines that are equipped with new particle filters and catalyzers are clearly lower than they used to be. Exposure can be reduced by regularly servicing engines, minimizing idling, improving ventilation, and ensuring that work machines’ cabs are airtight and their filters in good condition. Some diesel engines can be replaced by ones that run on electric or gas. An exhaust extraction system fitted onto an exhaust pipe is a good alternative in diesel engine service work, for example.

Target levels can help manage exposure and health risks

FIOH has proposed target levels for exhaust fumes in workplace air that can be used to manage exposure to diesel exhaust. Trying to comply with these levels results in lower health risks, and achieving them is often possible through reasonable measure s at many workplaces.

FIOH’s target levels for diesel exhaust are 5 µg/m3 (8-hour average concentration) when measured as elemental carbon, which is found in exhaust fume particles, and 0.2 ppm (15 min average concentration) when measured as nitrogen dioxide.  In mines and underground construction sites, the corresponding target level is 20 µg/m3 (8 h) and 0.5 ppm (15 min).  

Want to know more?

Contact:

Tiina Santonen, Senior Specialist, FIOH, +358 30 474 2666, tiina.santonen[at]ttl.fi

Piia Taxell, Researcher, FIOH, tel. +358 30 474 2234, piia.taxell[at]ttl.fi

Links

Taxell P., Santonen T. The Nordic Expert Group for Criteria Documentation of  Health Risks from Chemicals and the Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational  Safety. 149. Diesel engine exhaust. Arbete och Hälsa 2016; 49(6) 1–147: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/44340

Media Services

Kristiina Kulha, Head of Communications
FIOH, Helsinki
Tel. +358 30 474 2551, +358 40 548 6914, 
kristiina.kulha[at]ttl.fi

Tiina Kaksonen, Co-ordinator, Communications 
FIOH, Oulu
Tel. +358 30 474 3015, +358 50 364 3158
tiina.kaksonen[at]ttl.fi

www.ttl.fi

The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) researches, develops and specializes in well-being at work. It promotes occupational health and safety and the well-being of workers. It is an independent institution under public law, working under the administrative sector of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. It has five regional offices, and its headquarters are in Helsinki. The number of personnel is about 560.

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The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (Työterveyslaitos) researches, develops and specializes in well-being at work. It promotes occupational health and safety and the well-being of workers. It is an independent institution under public law, working under the administrative sector of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health. It has five regional offices, and its headquarters are in Helsinki. It employs about 560 people.

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