ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER LONG-RANGE CALENDAR: FEBRUARY THROUGH JUNE 2016

TEMPORARY EXHIBITIONS

Atlanta in 50 Objects

On display through July 10, 2016

Assembled based on some 300 suggestions by Atlantans of ideas or items that help identify Atlanta’s essential “Atlanta-ness,” this exhibition is filled with prized Atlanta-rooted treasures – from Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1964 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech manuscript to Georgia Tech’s Ramblin’ Wreck and from a 1915 Coca-Cola bottle mold to a touchable plaster cast of Zoo Atlanta’s Willie B’s handprints. And there are plenty of surprises that bring the story up to the moment, including the inclusion of objects that speak to Atlanta’s rising role in hip-hop music (OutKast’s “Speakerboxxx/The Love Below” album) and film and TV production (Michonne’s sword from “The Walking Dead”).

Other pieces in Atlanta in 50 Objects that tell the tale of an ever-evolving city: Martin Luther King’s notes for his Nobel Peace Prize speech, a CDC microscope, Atlanta Constitution editor Ralph McGill’s Presidential Medal of Freedom, a souvenir from the Cotton States Exposition, Priscilla the Pink Pig Christmas ride from Rich’s downtown department store, Hank Aaron’s 600th homerun bat and a soldier figurine from the original diorama at the Cyclorama (which will reopen in the new Lloyd and Mary Ann Whitaker Cyclorama building at the Atlanta History Center in 2017).

For more information, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/ATLin50. 

Fashion in Good Taste: Women in Atlanta, 1920-1969

On display April 7 - October 10, 2016

Swan House at the Atlanta History Center

From the sequined drop waist dresses of Jazz Age flappers to the military-style uniforms of World War II Red Cross workers, fashion is a public statement contextualizing the moments in our lives. The elegant and historic Swan House provides a unique backdrop to this fashion exhibition showcasing examples from the extensive textile collection of the Atlanta History Center. Each main room presents a variety of examples of the fashion and defining clothing of a particular decade spanning the 1920s to the 1960s, telling Atlanta’s past through fashion for each of the decades Swan House was occupied by the Inman family

For more information, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com

FAMILY AND ADULT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING

Programs and dates are subject to change.

Please call 404.814.4033 to confirm program dates.

February 2016

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Ross Howell, Jr., Forsaken

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

Ross Howell Jr.’s stunning debut novel Forsaken presents the chilling true story of Virginia Christian, an uneducated African American girl who was tried and convicted of murdering her white employer in 1912. Charlie Mears, a white man, covered the case as a rookie reporter. The book chronicles the story of the trial and its aftermath as seen through Mears’s eyes, weaving in actual court records, letters, and personal accounts.

The novel effortlessly blends fiction and reality, and portrays events both striking and horrific. Yet despite the immense tragedy at the heart of this fascinating novel, the story is ultimately one of redemption and hope.

Ross Howell Jr. pursued a career in marketing and publishing after earning a M.F.A. in the Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa. His fiction has appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review, Sewanee Review, Gettysburg Review, and other publications. He has taught essay writing, fiction writing, and literature at Harvard University, Simmons College, the University of Iowa, the University of Virginia, and, presently, Elon University. He currently resides in Greensboro, North Carolina.

Admission for all lectures is $5 members, $10 nonmembers, and free to AHC Insiders unless otherwise noted. Reservations are required, please call 404.814.4150 or reserve tickets online atMargaretMitchellHouse.com/Lectures.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Jim Wallis, America's Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge to a New America 

Thursday, February 11, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

America's problem with race has deep roots, with the country's foundation tied to the near extermination of one race of people and the enslavement of another. Racism is truly our nation's original sin. In America's Original Sin, Wallis offers a prophetic and deeply personal call to action in overcoming the racism so ingrained in American society.

Whenever divided cultures and gridlocked power structures fail to end systemic sin, faith communities can help lead the way to grassroots change. Probing yet positive, biblically rooted yet highly practical, this book shows people of faith how they can work together to overcome the embedded racism in America, galvanizing a movement to cross the bridge to a multiracial church and a new America.

Jim Wallis is president and founder of Sojourners and editor in chief of Sojourners magazine in Washington, D.C. He is a bestselling author, public theologian, national preacher, social activist, and international commentator on ethics and public life. Wallis has written ten books, including The (Un)Common Good and the New York Times bestsellers God's Politics and The Great Awakening.

Admission for all lectures is $5 members, $10 nonmembers, and free to AHC Insiders unless otherwise noted. Reservations are required, please call 404.814.4150 or reserve tickets online at AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Lectures.

Support: Presented as part of the Aiken Lecture Series, with support by the Lucy Rucker Aiken Foundation.

Georgia Perennial Plant Association lecture series

Patrick Cullina, former Vice President of Horticulture and Park Operations, New York City’s High Line

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

In his more than 20 years as a horticulturist and landscape designer, Patrick Cullina has worked intimately with renowned public and private gardens, museums, universities, and other professional organizations.  His design and consulting business in Manhattan is dedicated to the innovative and sensitive integration of plants and materials into a diverse range of compelling designs.  His expertise includes the design and creation of landscapes that are informed by a consideration for long term maintenance — spaces that provide ornamental interest throughout each of the seasons while being less consumptive than traditional public landscapes.

Free, reservations are not required. Event starts at 7:00 pm with sign-in, light refreshments and a chance to mingle with fellow garden enthusiasts. Members often pass on gardening magazines and catalogs in an open swap. Lectures begin at 7:30 pm.

Members-Only Genealogy Program: Researching Your Medieval British Isles Ancestors

Saturday, February 20, 2016 10:30 am – Noon

While English parish registers are invaluable resources for genealogists and historians, they typically begin during the Early Modern Period, sometime in the early 16thcentury. How do you go about finding information about your British Isles ancestors who lived previous to that time? There are a number of print sources, online databases, and digitized records available to genealogists and historians interested in learning more about the people and professions of medieval England. A majority of sources discussed will relate to England, but some information on Irish, Scottish, and Welsh records will also be included. Join Georgia State University College of Law professor Ryan Rowberry for a program designed to help you research your ancestors from the British Isles. 

This program is free for Atlanta History Center members. Reservations are required. Please RSVP to Membership@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.4101.

Poetry Out Loud Metro Atlanta Regional Competition

Saturday, February 20, 20161:00 – 3:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

The public is invited to attend the final metro Atlanta competition of this innovative program that encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization and performance of the written word. Poetry Out Loud, which began in 2005, incorporates the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, spoken word, and theater into the English and drama class. The metro Atlanta winner will compete in the State Finals Competition at the Atlanta History Center on March 20, 2016. Free. For more information, please visit MargaretMitchellHouse.com or contact Emil Reece at 404.814.4017.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Gail Lumet Buckley, The Black Colhouns

Thursday, February 25, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

In The Black Calhouns, Gail Lumet Buckley, daughter of Lena Horne, delves deep into her family history, detailing the experiences of an extraordinary African-American clan from the Civil War to Civil Rights. Beginning with her great-great grandfather Moses Calhoun, a house slave who used the rare advantage of his education to become a successful businessman in postwar Atlanta, Buckley follows her family’s Southern and Northern branches.

Through the lens of her relatives’ momentous lives, Buckley examines major events throughout American history, including Atlanta during Reconstruction and the rise of Jim Crow. Combining personal and national history, The Black Calhouns is a vibrant portrait of six generations during times of struggle and triumph.

Gail Lumet Buckley is author of the bestsellers American Patriots: The Story of Blacks in the Military from the Revolution to Desert Storm and The Hornes: An American Family, which became a PBS "American Masters" documentary.

Party With the Past Thursday, February 25, 2016 6:30 pm Location: Callanwolde Fine Arts Center

Atlanta History Center’s Party With the Past program series, designed to introduce ATL's young movers and shakers to the history of Atlanta, heads to Callanwolde Fine Arts Center to check out Charles Candler's historic digs. Oldest son of Coca-Cola magnate Asa Candler, Charles built the late-Gothic Revival home on a 22-acre estate designed by Frederick Law Olmsted. Get to know the city a little better and enjoy an evening of free history and cold beer at this beautiful historic mansion.

Admission is free. Registration strongly encouraged. For more information or to register, call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Party. 

Members-Only Program: Family Game Night

Friday, February 26, 2016

6:00 – 9 pm

Your wits and dexterity will serve you well in a night filled with fun, games, and challenges. Test your skill at history-themed games including Historic Guesstures, 19th century Relay Race, Scavenger Hunts, Trivia, and more. Plus, no Family Game Night at Atlanta History Center would be complete without a round of Stump the Historian! Light refreshments will be served.

This program is free for Atlanta History Center members. Reservations are required. Please RSVP to Membership@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.4101.

March 2016

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Ariel Lawhon, Flight of Dreams

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

With everyone onboard harboring dark secrets and at least one person determined to make sure the Hindenburg doesn't make the return trip, Flight of Dreams gives an utterly suspenseful, heart-wrenching explanation for one of the most enduring mysteries of the 20th century. 

On the evening of May 3, 1937, Emilie Imhof, the only female crewmember, boards the Hindenburg. Emilie has access to the entire airship and hears everything. But with rumors circulating about bomb threats, Emilie's focus is on maintaining a professional air …and keeping her own plans under wraps. What Emilie can't see is that everyone from the dynamic vaudeville acrobat to the high-ranking German officer seems to be hiding something.

Told through the alternating perspectives, Flight of Dreams gives free rein to theories of sabotage, charade, and mishap, taking readers on the thrilling three-day transatlantic flight. As the novel moves inexorably toward its tragic climax, the question of which of the passengers will survive infuses every scene with tension.  

Ariel Lawhon is co-founder of the popular online book club She Reads, a novelist, blogger, and life-long reader. She’s the author of one previous novel, The Wife, the Maid and the Mistress She lives in the rolling hills outside Nashville, Tennessee, with her husband and four young sons and a black lab who is, thankfully, a girl.

Bank of America Museums on Us

Saturday and Sunday, March 5 and 6, 2016

Atlanta History Center is a proud participant in Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. During the first full weekend of every month, all Bank of America/Merrill Lynch customers receive free all-inclusive admission to the Atlanta History Center, including the Atlanta History Museum, Centennial Olympic Games Museum, 1860s Smith Family Farm, 1928 Swan House, and 22 acres of Goizueta Gardens. To redeem this offer, visitors must present a valid Bank of America ATM, debit, or credit card, along with a photo ID.  Bank of America associates are also eligible for free admission by presenting their current Bank of America Corporate ID card, and a photo ID. Visit www.bankofamerica.com/museums for more information on other participating institutions across the country.

The Phoenix Flies: A Celebration of Atlanta’s Historic Sites

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

11 am: Cherokee Garden Library tour

1 pm: Kenan Research Center tour

Location: Atlanta History Center

On separate tours, explore the intriguing collections of the Kenan Research Center and one of its special subject libraries, the Cherokee Garden Library. View historic photographs, documents and rare books pertaining to Atlanta’s history and landscape heritage.

Free. Reservations required. Check in at McElreath Hall security desk. For more information or to register, call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Randy Roberts and Johnny Smith, Blood Brothers: The Fatal Friendship Between Muhammed Ali and Malcolm X

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

In 1962, boxing writers and fans considered Cassius Clay an obnoxious self-promoter, and few believed that he would become the heavyweight champion of the world. But Malcolm X, the most famous minister in the Nation of Islam, a sect many white Americans deemed a hate cult, saw the potential in Clay. Malcolm X believed that Clay would achieve boxing greatness, making him a great messenger for the Nation of Islam. The two became fast friends, keeping their interactions secret from the press for fear of jeopardizing Clay’s career. Soon, however, their friendship would sour, with disastrous and far-reaching consequences.Based on previously untapped sources, from Malcolm X’s personal papers to FBI records, Blood Brothers is the first book to offer an in-depth portrait of this complex bond. Historians Randy Roberts and Johnny Smith reconstruct the worlds that shaped Malcolm and Clay as well as postwar New York and civil rights-era Miami. In this detailed account, they reveal how Malcolm molded Cassius Clay into Muhammad Ali, helping him become an international symbol of black pride and black independence. Yet when Malcolm was barred from the Nation for criticizing the philandering of its leader, Elijah Muhammad, Ali turned his back on Malcolm — a choice that contributed to the latter’s assassination in February 1965.

Randy Roberts is a Purdue University Distinguished Professor of History who has written biographies of iconic athletes and celebrities, including Jack Johnson, Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis, Bear Bryant, and John Wayne. Johnny Smith is a Georgia Tech Assistant Professor of American History and author of The Sons of Westwood: John Wooden, UCLA, and the Dynasty that Changed College Basketball.

Support:Presented as part of the Elson Lecture Series, supported with generous funding from Ambassador and Mrs. Edward Elson.

Homeschool Day: Legendary Empires

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

1:00 – 4:00 pm

Explore history’s greatest empires, from the Aztecs to the Egyptians, the Romans to the Zulus, and many others in between.  Learn how empires rise and fall, and examine the mythology and culture behind these historic powerhouses.

Admission to Homeschool Days is $8.50 nonmembers; $6.50 children of members; and free for adult members. Discounted rates are available for groups with 10 or more children. For more information, or to make group reservations, please call 404.814.4018or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Homeschool.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

General Michael Hayden, Playing to the Edge

Thursday, March 10, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

Playing to the Edge is an unprecedented narrative of America’s intelligence wars at a time of heinous new threats and wrenching change. For retired Air Force General Michael Hayden, playing to the edge means playing so close to the line that you get chalk dust on your cleats. That’s a superior choice, he believes, to playing back, where you may protect yourself but be less successful in protecting America. "Play to the edge" was Hayden's guiding principle when he led the National Security Agency, and it remained so when he ran the Central Intelligence Agency. His memoir is an unapologetic insider's look, told from the perspective of the people who faced awesome responsibilities head on, in the moment.     As Director of the CIA in the last three years of the Bush administration, Hayden had to deal with the rendition, detention, and interrogation program as bequeathed to him by his predecessors. He also had to ramp up the agency to support its role in the targeted killing program that began to dramatically increase in July 2008. This was a time of great crisis at the CIA, and some agency veterans have credited Hayden with saving the agency. He himself won't go that far, but he acknowledges that the CIA helped turn the American security establishment into the most effective killing machine in the history of armed conflict.

Michael Hayden is a retired United States Air Force four-star general and former Director of the National Security Agency, Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. He is currently a principal at the Chertoff Group, a security consultancy founded by former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff. Hayden also serves as a Distinguished Visiting Professor at George Mason University School of Public Policy.

Support:Presented as part of the Livingston Lecture Series, made possible with generous funding from the Livingston Foundation.

Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate Your Food Traditions Saturday, March 12, 2016 10:30 am – Noon

Family recipes can be heartwarmingly nostalgic and a wonderful way to learn more about your heritage, but they can also be problematic. Your recipes may be faded, sketchy or even unwritten. Is there lore connected to family foodways that should be recorded or photographs that could be added to your recipes to make them more appealing to future generations? And how can you make sure family recipes, stories, photos, and artifacts last as long as possible? The book Preserving Family Recipes: How to Save and Celebrate Your Food Traditions (UGA Press) explores family foodways and addresses these issues.  Join Valerie J. Frey, former Manuscript Archivist for the Georgia Historical Society and Education Coordinator for the Georgia Archives, for a program designed to help you preserve your family’s food traditions. 

Tickets are $10 for Atlanta History Center members and $15 for nonmembers. Reservations are recommended. For more information, please call 404.814.4042 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com

Buckhead 4-H Community Club Monthly Meeting Sunday, March 13, 2016

2:00 – 3:15 pm

Atlanta History Center is the community gathering place for the Buckhead 4-H Community Club’s monthly meetings and programming. Each meeting focuses on leadership, community service, and an educational component that is hands-on and of interest to young people. Program attendees also engage in group activities that promote personal development, healthy lifestyles, a sense of citizenship, and character education. The educational programs are divided into two age groups: 4ththrough 6thgrades and 7ththrough 12thgrades.

For more Information, please call 404.762.4085 or email Ashley Wadley, 4-H and Youth Development, at awadley@uga.edu.

The Phoenix Flies: A Celebration of Atlanta’s Historic Sites

Monday, March 14, 2016

9:30 am and 4 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

Operated by the Atlanta History Center, the Margaret Mitchell House is a designated city landmark listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a popular tourist destination, and home to the Literary Center at the Margaret Mitchell House. It features guided tours of the apartment where Margaret Mitchell wrote “Gone With the Wind,” two exhibitions on Mitchell and “GWTW,” and the Margaret Mitchell House gift shop.

Free. Reservations required. Check in at Crescent Avenue entrance. For more information or to register, call 404.249.7015 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Magic Monday: Egg Hunt on the Farm

Monday, March 14, 2016

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Toddlers and preschoolers celebrate springtime on the farm during our annual egg hunt. Join the search for colorful eggs hidden throughout Smith Family Farm to win prizes. Participate in fun and games like the peep toss, doing the bunny hop, and creating spring crafts. Hop on by and visit the Easter Bunny!

Each Magic Monday has a unique monthly theme and includes a guided exploration of one of our award-winning exhibitions, historic houses, or Goizueta Gardens, as well as demonstrations, arts and crafts projects, and story time.

Members are admitted for free. Admission is $6.50 adults; $5.50 children. Discounted rates are available for groups with ten or more children. For more information, please call 404.814.4110 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/MagicMondays.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

Members Guild Spring Luncheon

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

11:30 am Location: Atlanta History Center

The Members Guild of the Atlanta History Center hosts their annual spring luncheon with a program celebrating fashion history in collaboration with the High Museum of Art. Chaired by Georgia Schley Ritchie and presented by Cindy and Bill Voyles, the gathering will feature a special presentation on the High Museum of Art exhibition Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion. Proceeds support educational activities of the Atlanta History Center.

Tickets begin at $175. For more information, please contact Katherine Hoogerwerf at KHoogerwerf@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or 404.814.4102.

Georgia Perennial Plant Association garden lecture series

Karen Perkins, owner of Garden Visions Epimediums, Templeton, Mass.: “Jewels of the Shade”

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

Known by many as a simple ground cover for dry woodland shade, Epimediums are finally receiving the appreciation that they deserve. This "perfect shade perennial" possesses a delicate beauty that belies its surprisingly tough, long-lasting nature. Karen Perkins will illustrate the many and varied types now commercially available, including new evergreen species from China. Characteristics, growth habit, growing and propagation, pests and diseases, and combining Epimediums with other shade perennials in the garden also will be addressed.

Free, reservations are not required. Event starts at 7:00 pm with sign-in, light refreshments and a chance to mingle with fellow garden enthusiasts. Members often pass on gardening magazines and catalogs in an open swap. Lectures begin at 7:30 pm.

Poetry Out Loud State Final Competition

Sunday, March 20, 20161:00 – 4:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

The public is invited to attend the Georgia final competition of this innovative program that encourages high school students to learn about great poetry through memorization and performance of the written word. Poetry Out Loud, which began in 2005, incorporates the dynamic aspects of slam poetry, spoken word, and theater into the English and drama class. The Georgia winner competes at the National Finals in Washington, D.C. in May 2016.

Free. For more information, please visit MargaretMitchellHouse.com or contact Emil Reece at 404.814.4017.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Patricia Bell-Scott, The Firebrand and the First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Struggle for Social Justice

Thursday, March 24, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

Pauli Murray first saw Eleanor Roosevelt in 1933, at the height of the Depression, at a government-sponsored, 200-acre camp for unemployed women where Murray, the granddaughter of a mulatto slave, was living. The First Lady had pushed her husband to set up the camp in her effort to do what she could for working women and the poor. Roosevelt, whose ancestry gave her membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution, drove up one day unannounced, her secretary and a Secret Service agent her passengers. To Murray, then 23, Roosevelt’s self-assurance was a symbol of women’s independence, one that influenced her life.  Five years later, Murray, an aspiring writer, wrote a letter to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt protesting racial segregation in the South. Mrs. Roosevelt wrote back. So began a friendship between the First Lady and Murray – who would become a renowned poet, intellectual rebel, principal strategist in the fight to preserve Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, cofounder of the National Organization for Women, and the first African American female Episcopal priest. Two decades in the works, Patricia Bell-Scott’s chronicle shows how their enduring friendship helped alter the course of race relations in America.

Patricia Bell-Scott is Professor Emerita of women’s studies and human development and family science at the University of Georgia. Her previous books include Life Notes: Personal Writings by Contemporary Black Women, Flat-Footed Truths: Telling Black Women’s Lives, and Double Stitch: Black Women Write About Mothers & Daughters, which won the Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Prize.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Lauren Weedman, Miss Fortune

Friday, March 25, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

Lauren Weedman, former Daily Show correspondent and acclaimed star of HBO’s Looking, is not OK.  She’s living what should be the good life in sunny Los Angeles.  She has a great career, a loving husband, and an adorable baby boy, but she finds herself starring in a tabloid-worthy nightmare.  In Miss Fortune, her second collection of nonfiction stories, Weedman turns a piercingly observant, darkly funny lens on the way her life is actually Not OK.

Lauren Weedman's television credits include The Daily Show, True Blood, United States of Tara, Reno 911, Curb Your Enthusiasm, New Girl, Arrested Development, Horny Patty on HBO's Hung and Doris on HBO's Looking. Film credits include Imagine That, Date Night and A Five Year Engagement. Weedman's first book, A Woman Trapped in a Woman's Body: Tales from a Life of Cringe, was named by Kirkus as a top 10 indie book for 2007. She is the host of the popular Moth Storytelling series in Los Angeles.

Chicks in the City: 2016 Symposium

Saturday, March 26, 2016

9:30 am – 4:30 pm

In partnership with Decatur’s Wylde Center, the Chicks in the City Symposium, taking place at Smith Family Farm at the Atlanta History Center, shares everything you need to know about urban chickens. Learn how to raise chickens, whether as for pets or to provide eggs for breakfast or waste disposal.

Registration is $50, and includes all-inclusive access to the Atlanta History Center. Please call 404.371.1920 or visit www.wyldecenter.org.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Jacquelyn Mitchard, Two If By Sea

Monday, March 28, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

The suspenseful novel Two If By Sea is about the best and worst in people, and the possibility of heroism and even magic in ordinary life.

Just hours after his wife and her entire family perish in the Christmas Eve tsunami in Brisbane, American expat and former police officer Frank Mercy joins his volunteer rescue unit and pulls a little boy from a submerged car. Without quite knowing why, Frank sidesteps the law, when, instead of turning Ian over to the Red Cross, he takes him to the Midwestern farm of Frank’s youth. There, Frank begins to suspect that Ian has an extraordinary, impossible telepathic gift.

As Frank struggles to start over, training horses, he meets Claudia, a champion equestrian and someone with whom he can share his life — and his fears for Ian. They know that it will be impossible to keep the boy’s gift a secret forever. The fight to keep Ian safe from a sinister group who wants him back takes readers from the ravaged shores of Brisbane to Middle America to a quaint English village.

New York Times bestselling author Jacquelyn Mitchard has written many novels for adults, young adult novels; children’s books; a memoir, Mother Less Child; and a collection of essays, The Rest of UsDispatches from the Mother Ship. Her first novel, The Deep End of the Ocean, was the inaugural selection of the Oprah Winfrey Book Club, and was later adapted for a feature film starring and produced by Michelle Pfeiffer. Mitchard is the editor in chief and co-creator of Merit Press and a Professor of fiction and creative nonfiction at Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier.

April 2016

Bank of America Museums on Us

Saturday and Sunday, April 2 and 3, 2016

Atlanta History Center is a proud participant in Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. During the first full weekend of every month, all Bank of America/Merrill Lynch customers receive free all-inclusive admission to the Atlanta History Center, including the Atlanta History Museum, Centennial Olympic Games Museum, 1860s Smith Family Farm, 1928 Swan House, and 22 acres of Goizueta Gardens. To redeem this offer, visitors must present a valid Bank of America ATM, debit, or credit card, along with a photo ID.  Bank of America associates are also eligible for free admission by presenting their current Bank of America Corporate ID card, and a photo ID. Visit www.bankofamerica.com/museums for more information on other participating institutions across the country.

Homeschool Day: Go West

Thursday, April 7, 2016

1:00 – 4:00 pm

Search for the Northwest Passage with Lewis and Clarke, defend the Alamo with Davy Crockett, prospect for gold with the 49ers, risk everything on the Oregon Trail, and peak inside the real lives of gunslingers and homesteaders like Jesse James and Laura Ingalls.

Admission to Homeschool Days is $8.50 nonmembers; $6.50 children of members; and free for adult members. Discounted rates are available for groups with 10 or more children. For more information, or to make group reservations, please call 404.814.4018or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Homeschool.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

For Members Only: Sheep to Shawl Petting Zoo Saturday, April 9, 2016 9:30 – 10:30 am

Enjoy one hour of Members-Only access to the wonderful and gentle animals from the Little Red Barn Petting Zoo at Smith Family Farm. Light refreshments and crafts will be available before the public program begins at 10:30 am. And save room for lunch! Souper Jenny at the Atlanta History Center will officially be open.

This program is free for Atlanta History Center members. Reservations are required. Please RSVP to Membership@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.4101.

Sheep to Shawl Saturday, April 9, 2016 10:30 am – 4:30 pm

Get a unique view into the process of cloth making though demonstrations and activities ranging from sheep shearing and dyeing to spinning and weaving. Gather the entire family for a full day of fun that also includes open hearth cooking, blacksmithing, candle making, and much more at Smith Family Farm. This year, journey from Sheep to Shawl to Sequins and Chanel while exploring the new Swan House exhibit, Fashion in Good Taste: Women in Atlanta from 1920-1969. Interactive activities give families a fun opportunity to learn how mass production, major events of the twentieth century, and daily life influenced women’s clothing.

This program is free to members; included in the cost of general admission for nonmembers. For more information or to purchase admission tickets, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Family.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

James McBride, Kill ‘Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul

Monday, April 11, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

National Book Award winner James McBride goes in search of the “real” James Brown, and his surprising journey illuminates not only our understanding of the Godfather of Soul but the ways in which our cultural heritage has been shaped by the singer’s legacy.  A product of the complicated history of the American South, Brown was a cultural shape-shifter who arguably had the greatest influence on American popular music of any artist. When McBride receives a tip that promises to uncover the man behind the myth, he follows a trail that reveals the personal, musical, and societal influences that created this immensely troubled, misunderstood, and complicated soul genius. In Kill ‘Em and Leave, he uncovers a story that helps to explain Brown’s legacy: the cultural landscape of America today.

James McBride is the author of the National Book Award winner and New York Times bestseller The Good Lord Bird, the bestselling novels Song Yet Sung and Miracle at St. Anna, and the New York Times bestseller The Color of Water. He also is a saxophonist and composer who teaches music to children in the Red Hook Brooklyn housing projects where he was born, and a New York University journalism professor.

Support:Presented as part of he Livingston Lecture Series,made possible with generous funding from the Livingston Foundation.

Magic Monday: Let’s Play!

Monday, April 11, 2016

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Toddlers and preschoolers learn how to play with toys and games from different time periods, from Hoop and Stick to Simon Says. Each Magic Monday has a unique monthly theme and includes a guided exploration of one of our award-winning exhibitions, historic houses, or Goizueta Gardens, as well as demonstrations, arts and crafts projects, and story time.  Members are admitted for free. Admission is $6.50 adults; $5.50 children. Discounted rates are available for groups with ten or more children. For more information, please call 404.814.4110 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/MagicMondays.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Cherokee Garden Library presents Southern Uncovered: An Evening with the Lee Brothers Tuesday, April 12, 2016

6:30 pm: Southern small bites and signature cocktails7:30 pm: Program

Location: Atlanta History Center

Award-winning authors Matt Lee and Ted Lee, whose latest is “The Lee Bros. Charleston Kitchen,”  will be your culinary ambassadors for the evening, sharing charming insights into the South’s most storied and buzzed-about food and food destinations. With special host Angie Mosier, food stylist, cookbook photographer, pastry chef, and past president of the Southern Foodways Alliance.

Admission for this lecture is $35. Reservations are required. Please call 404.814.4150 or reserve tickets online at AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Lectures.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by Alex Smith Garden Design, Ltd., Revival Construction, Springer Mountain Farms, and Avalon Catering.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

J. Aaron Sanders, Speakers of the Dead: A Walt Whitman Mystery

Thursday, April 14, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

The year is 1843, the place, New York City. Aurora reporter Walt Whitman arrives at The Tombs prison yard where his friend, Lena Stowe, is scheduled to hang for the murder of her husband, Abraham. Whitman intends to present evidence on Lena's behalf, but is turned away by the sheriff. Lena drops to her death, and Walt vows to exonerate her. 

With the help of his estranged boyfriend, Henry Saunders, Walt uncovers a link between body-snatching and Abraham's murder: a man named Samuel Clement. To get to Clement, Walt and Henry descend into a dangerous underworld where resurrection men steal the bodies of the recently deceased and sell them to medical colleges. Abraham's involvement with the Bone Bill, legislation that would put the resurrection men out of business, appears to have led to his and Lena's deaths. 

Speakers of the Dead is a reimagining of one of America's most beloved literary and historical figures.

J. Aaron Sanders is an Associate Professor of English at Columbus State University. His stories have appeared in Carolina Quarterly, Gulf Coast, Quarterly West, and Beloit Fiction Journal. This is his first novel.

Swan House Ball

Saturday, April 16, 2016

7 pm

One of the Southeast’s most anticipated events, this year’s Swan House Ball honors the theme, “Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow,” Chaired by Spring Asher and Victoria Palefsky, this year’s Swan House Ball honors Mary Ann and Lloyd Whitaker and their philanthropic leadership of the Atlanta Cyclorama project, set to debut 2017 at the Atlanta History Center  

For more information, please contact Katherine Hoogerwerf at KHoogerwerf@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or 404.814.4102. www.AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/SwanHouseBall.

Support:Presenting sponsor of the 2016 Swan House Ball is Atlantic Trust. Cox Enterprises and Delta Air Lines are the Platinum sponsor. 

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Jessica Knoll, Luckiest Girl Alive

Monday, April 18, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

Her perfect life is a perfect lie. Meet Ani FaNelli, who’s spent years glossing over the public and private humiliations she endured at prep school to create a shiny new persona with the great job, perfect fiancé, and wardrobe full of designer handbags. Jessica Knoll’s best-selling debut Luckiest Girl Alive takes these familiar tropes of women’s fiction and turns them on their heads with a biting anti-heroine and dark, unexpected twists readers won’t see coming.

Jessica Knoll has been an editor at Self and Cosmopolitan magazines. Her first novel, Luckiest Girl Alive is an instant New York Times bestseller, and the movie rights have been acquired by Lionsgate, with Reese Witherspoon producing.

Georgia Perennial Plant Association garden lecture series

Brie Arthur, horticulturist and foodscaping expert: “Growing a Greener World”

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

Respected around the world for her plant propagation skills, Brie Arthur was recently featured in Organic Gardening Magazine as a rising star of horticulture. In her one-acre suburban North Carolina landscape she grows a wide assortment of edible and ornamental plants. She is on a mission to encourage people across the U.S. to use their everyday landscapes as a source for health and nutrition through the hobby of gardening. Arthur will explain why pairing edibles in a traditional ornamental landscape is functional, convenient, and attractive.

Free, reservations are not required. Event starts at 7:00 pm with sign-in, light refreshments and a chance to mingle with fellow garden enthusiasts. Members often pass on gardening magazines and catalogs in an open swap. Lectures begin at 7:30 pm.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Lee Smith, Dimestore: A Writer’s Life

Thursday, April 21, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Margaret Mitchell House

In her first work of nonfiction, Lee Smith deploys the wit, wisdom, and graceful prose for which she is beloved to conjure her early days in the small coal town of Grundy, Virginia, and beyond.   For the inimitable Smith, place is paramount. For 45 years, her fiction has lived and breathed with the rhythms and people of the Appalachian South. But never before has she written her own story. Set deep in the rugged Appalachian Mountains, the Grundy of Smith’s youth was a place of coal miners, mountain music, and her daddy’s dimestore. It was in that shop, where she listened to customers and invented life histories for the store’s dolls, that she began to learn the craft of storytelling. Even though she adored Grundy, Smith’s formal education and travels took her far from Virginia, though her Appalachian upbringing never left her. Dimestore’s 15 essays are honest, wise, and entertaining. Smith has created both a moving, personal portrait and a broade

broader meditation on embracing one’s heritage. Hers is an inspiring story of the birth of a writer and a poignant look at a way of life that has all but vanished. 

Lee Smith began writing stories at the age of nine and selling them for a nickel apiece. Since then, she has written 17 works of fiction, including Fair and Tender Ladies, Oral History, and, most recently, Guests on Earth. She has received many awards, including the North Carolina Award for Literature and an  American Academy of Arts and Letters fiction award. Her novel The Last Girls was a New York Times bestseller as well as winner of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Dave Isay, Callings

Monday, April 25, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

StoryCorps founder Dave Isay presents unforgettable stories from people doing what they love. Some are paid well for their work, others not at all; some found their paths at a very young age, others later in life; many overcame great odds or upturned their lives in order to pursue what matters to them. We meet a man from the barrios of Texas whose harrowing experiences in a family of migrant farmers inspired him to become a public defender. We meet a longtime waitress who takes pride in making regulars and newcomers alike feel at home in her Nashville diner. We meet a young man on the South Side of Chicago who became a teacher in order to help at-risk teenagers like the ones who killed his father get on the right track.

Together they demonstrate how work can be about much more than just making a living, that chasing dreams and finding inspiration in unexpected places can transform a vocation into a calling. Their shared sense of passion, honor, and commitment brings deeper meaning and satisfaction to every aspect of their lives. Callings is an inspiring tribute to rewarding work and the American pursuit of happiness.

Dave Isay is the founder of StoryCorps and the recipient of numerous broadcasting honors, including six Peabody awards, a MacArthur “Genius“ Fellowship, and the 2015 TED Prize. He is the author/editor of numerous books that grew out of his public radio documentary work, including four StoryCorps books (all New York Times bestsellers): Listening Is an Act of Love, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps, All There Is: Love Stories from StoryCorps, and Ties That Bind. Isay is also an executive producer of StoryCorps Shorts, as seen on the PBS documentary series POV.

Olmstead Plein Air Invitational Day at the Atlanta History Center

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Time TBA

Thirty six of the country’s top outdoor painters will produce art from life “in the open air” across the Atlanta History Center’s 33-acre campus, with the public invited to observe as the artists create finished paintings before their eyes. In its second year, the Olmstead Plein Air Invitational will take place at Atlanta sites including the Olmstead Linear Park and Atlanta Botanical Garden from April 25 through May 1, 2016. For more information, call 404.376.7075 or visit www.olmstedpleinair.com.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Margaret Mitchell House

Martha Hall Kelly, Lilac Girls

Thursday, April 28, 2016

7:00 pmLocation: Margaret Mitchell House

New York socialite Caroline Ferriday has her hands full with her post at the French consulate and a new love on the horizon. But Caroline’s world is forever changed when Hitler’s army invades Poland in September 1939, and then sets its sights on France. An ocean away, Kasia Kuzmerick, a Polish teenager, senses her carefree youth disappearing as she is drawn deeper into her role as courier for the underground resistance. For the ambitious young German doctor, Herta Oberheuser, an ad for a government medical position seems her ticket out of a desolate life, but then she finds herself trapped in a male-dominated realm of Nazi secrets and power.   The lives of these three women are set on a collision course when the unthinkable happens and Kasia is sent to Ravensbrück, the Nazi concentration camp for women. Their stories cross continents as Caroline and Kasia strive to bring justice to those whom history has forgotten.

Martha Hall Kelly is a native New Englander who splits her time between New York City, Martha's Vineyard and Atlanta. She worked as an advertising copywriter for many years, and raised three children who are now mostly out of the nest. This is her first novel.

May 2016

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

George Hodgman, Bettyville

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

When George Hodgman, an unlikely caretaker and near-lethal cook, leaves Manhattan for his hometown of Paris, Missouri, he finds himself in a head-on collision with his aging mother, Betty.  Will George lure this woman of wit and will into assisted living?  When hell freezes over.

He can’t bring himself to force her from the home both treasure — the place where his father’s voice lingers and the scene of shared jokes and skirmishes. And, behind the dusty antiques, there is a rarely acknowledged conflict: Betty, who speaks her mind but cannot quite reveal her heart, has never really accepted the fact that her son is gay. Hodgman’s New York Times bestselling memoir is both an indelible portrait of a family and an exquisitely told tale of a prodigal son’s return.

George Hodgman is a veteran magazine and book editor who has worked at Simon & Schuster, Vanity Fair and Talk magazine. His writing has appeared in Entertainment Weekly, Interview, W and Harper’s Bazaar, among other publications.

Admission is $5 for Atlanta History Center members; $10 for nonmembers; and free for AHC Insiders. Dessert reception and book signing following the program. Reservations are required; please call 404.814.4150 or purchase advance tickets online at AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Lectures.

Support:This is the 20th annual Sidney Isenberg Lecture, established by his friends, colleagues, and family as an expression of love and appreciation for his values and commitment to the healing process and to the advancement of learning and growth. They affirm Isenberg’s conviction that the human relationship is the agency through which change comes about.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Marc Wortman, 1941: Fighting the Shadow War

Thursday, May 5, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

Conventional wisdom dictates that the U.S. entered World War II in retaliation for the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 8, 1941. However, in 1941: Fighting the Shadow War, historian Marc Wortman reveals the ways in which America played an increasingly significant and clandestine role in the years prior to officially joining the battle.

Timed to the 75thanniversary year of U.S. entry into World War II, 1941 interweaves military, political, and social history to tell the story of how President Franklin D. Roosevelt used the powers at his disposal to battle with Hitler and the Japanese in the shadows. While the American populace was sympathetic to the people being crushed under the Axis powers, they were unwilling to enter a foreign war. FDR knew he had to fight against isolationism, anti-Semitism, and the scars of World War I to win the war of public sentiment. Wortman narrates FDR’s path to war with a momentum and perspective that casts the story in new light.

Marc Wortman is the author of The Millionaires' Unit: The Aristocratic Flyboys Who Fought the Great War and Invented American Air Power and The Bonfire: The Siege and Burning of Atlanta. He has written feature articles for Vanity Fair and Smithsonian, and frequently contributes reviews and essays to The Daily Beast.

Support:Presented as part of the Elson Lecture Series, made possible with generous funding from Ambassador and Mrs. Edward Elson.

National Public Gardens Day

Friday, May 6, 2016 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Enjoy free admission to all gardens at Atlanta History Center and Cherokee Garden Library. Sitting on 22 acres, the Atlanta History Center is home to six historic gardens that each represent a period in Georgia History, from pre-colonial settlement to 1930s aesthetics.  Paired with outdoor offerings is the Cherokee Garden Library, a bastion of resources that document the horticultural and botanical history in the Southeast.

Tours:Mary Howard Gilbert Memorial Garden – 10:00 amSmith Family Farm – 1:00 pmSwan House Gardens – 3:00 pmCherokee Garden Library – 11:00 am, 2:00 pm

Admission to the gardens for National Public Gardens Day is free. Access to the historic houses and Atlanta History Center Museum is included in cost of general admission. For more information, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.4000.

Homeschool Day: The Story of Atlanta

Friday, May 6, 2016

1:00 – 4:00 pm

Join us on an epic journey through time as we explore Atlanta’s stories from its earliest inhabitants to the Civil War and the Civil Rights Movement, up to today. Encounter not only famous characters from Atlanta’s past, but the ordinary people crucial to the development of the Gate City of the South. 

Admission to Homeschool Days is $8.50 nonmembers; $6.50 children of members; and free for adult members. Discounted rates are available for groups with 10 or more children. For more information, or to make group reservations, please call 404.814.4018or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Homeschool.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

Bank of America Museums on Us

Saturday and Sunday, May 7 and 8, 2016

Atlanta History Center is a proud participant in Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. During the first full weekend of every month, all Bank of America/Merrill Lynch customers receive free all-inclusive admission to the Atlanta History Center, including the Atlanta History Museum, Centennial Olympic Games Museum, 1860s Smith Family Farm, 1928 Swan House, and 22 acres of Goizueta Gardens. To redeem this offer, visitors must present a valid Bank of America ATM, debit, or credit card, along with a photo ID.  Bank of America associates are also eligible for free admission by presenting their current Bank of America Corporate ID card, and a photo ID. Visit www.bankofamerica.com/museums for more information on other participating institutions across the country.

Magic Monday: Down on the Farm

Monday, May 9, 2016

10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Toddlers and preschoolers join in on fun springtime activities down on the farm! Visit the sheep, goats, and chickens, and learn about farm chores like wool washing, blacksmithing, and open hearth cooking.

Each Magic Monday has a unique monthly theme and includes a guided exploration of one of our award-winning exhibitions, historic houses, or Goizueta Gardens, as well as demonstrations, arts and crafts projects, and story time. Join us for another exciting year and connect with old friends while meeting new ones.

Members are admitted for free. Admission is $6.50 adults; $5.50 children. Discounted rates are available for groups with ten or more children. For more information, please call 404.814.4110 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/MagicMondays.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

Buckhead 4-H Community Club Monthly Meeting Sunday, May 15, 2016

2:00 – 3:15 pm

Atlanta History Center is the community gathering place for the Buckhead 4-H Community Club’s monthly meetings and programming. Each meeting focuses on leadership, community service, and an educational component that is hands-on and of interest to young people. Program attendees also engage in group activities that promote personal development, healthy lifestyles, a sense of citizenship, and character education. The educational programs are divided into two age groups: 4ththrough 6thgrades and 7ththrough 12thgrades.

For more Information, please call 404.762.4085 or email Ashley Wadley, 4-H and Youth Development, at awadley@uga.edu.

Georgia Perennial Plant Association garden lecture series

The Barbara Allen Lecture

Keynote speaker to be announced

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

The Barbara Allen Lecture honors the work and memory of one of the founding members of the Georgia Perennial Plant Association.  This is the premier lecture hosted by the GPPA annually and presents renowned visionaries in the field of either landscape design or English gardens.

Free, reservations are not required. Event starts at 7:00 pm with sign-in, light refreshments and a chance to mingle with fellow garden enthusiasts. Members often pass on gardening magazines and catalogs in an open swap. Lectures begin at 7:30 pm.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Joshua C. Kendall, First Dads: Parenting and Politics from George Washington to Barack Obama

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

Every president has had some experience as a parent. Of the 43 men who have served in the nation’s highest office, 38 have fathered biological children and the other five adopted children. Each president’s parenting style reveals much about his beliefs as well as his psychological make-up. James Garfield enjoyed jumping on the bed with his kids. FDR’s children, on the other hand, had to make appointments to talk to him.

In a lively narrative, based on research in archives around the country, Kendall shows presidential character in action and examines how the fathering experiences of our presidents have changed the course of American history.

Joshua C. Kendall is the author of The Man Who Made Lists, about the creation of Roget's Thesaurus, and The Forgotten Founding Father, a biography of Noah Webster, the lexicographer responsible for Webster's Dictionary. His journalistic work has appeared in the Wall Street JournalLos Angeles Times, New York TimesPsychology Today, and Business Week. He is an Associate Fellow of Yale's Trumbull College.

Support:Presented as part of the Elson Lecture Series, made possible with generous funding from Ambassador and Mrs. Edward Elson.

Military Timeline

Saturday, May 28, 2016

10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Spend the day traveling the military timeline from the Revolutionary War to current conflicts. Meet veterans who share personal stories and memorabilia from wartime and living history interpreters that engage visitors of all ages. Also enjoy self-guided tours of Veterans Park using smartphones to access recordings of stories shared by those who served the United States Armed Forces. This program is free to members; included in the cost of general admission for nonmembers. For more information or to purchase admission tickets, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Family.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

One for the Books: Author Programs at Atlanta History Center

Joseph Ellis, The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

8:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

From Pulitzer Prize–winning American historian Joseph J. Ellis, the unexpected story of why the 13 colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew.While the famous opening phrase of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address reads, “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this Continent a new Nation,” the truth is different. In 1776, the American colonies declared themselves independent states that only temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways.

The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men most responsible — George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison. With the help of Robert Morris and Gouverneur Morris, they shaped the contours of American history by diagnosing the systemic dysfunctions created by the Articles of Confederation, manipulating the political process to force the calling of the Constitutional Convention, conspiring to set the agenda in Philadelphia, orchestrating the debate in the state ratifying conventions, and, finally, drafting the Bill of Rights to assure state compliance with the constitutional settlement. The Quartet unmasks a myth, and in its place presents an even more compelling truth — one that lies at the heart of understanding the creation of the United States of America.

Joseph J. Ellis is one of the nation's leading scholars of American history. The author of nine books, Ellis was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation and won the National Book Award for American Sphinx, a biography of Thomas Jefferson. His in-depth chronicle of the life of our first President, His Excellency: George Washington, was a New York Times bestseller. Ellis has taught in the Leadership Studies program at Williams College. He previously taught at the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts, Mount Holyoke College, and the United States Military Academy at West Point. He lives in Amherst, MA with his wife, Ellen Wilkins Ellis and three dogs. He is the father of three sons.

June 2016

Members-Only Event: Night at the Museum

Friday, June 3, 2016

6:00 - 9:00 pm

There is something different about Atlanta History Center’s new exhibition at night. People have gone in, but when they come out, something about them has changed. They have experienced something that defies space and time. They come out transformed, they come out triumphant. Come meet the characters of Atlanta’s past and help them save the future. Light refreshments will be served. 

This program is free for Atlanta History Center members. Reservations are required. Please RSVP to Membership@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.4101.

Bank of America Museums on Us

Saturday and Sunday, June 4 and 5, 2016

Atlanta History Center is a proud participant in Bank of America’s national Museums on Us program. During the first full weekend of every month, all Bank of America/Merrill Lynch customers receive free all-inclusive admission to the Atlanta History Center, including the Atlanta History Museum, Centennial Olympic Games Museum, 1860s Smith Family Farm, 1928 Swan House, and 22 acres of Goizueta Gardens. To redeem this offer, visitors must present a valid Bank of America ATM, debit, or credit card, along with a photo ID.  Bank of America associates are also eligible for free admission by presenting their current Bank of America Corporate ID card, and a photo ID. Visit www.bankofamerica.com/museums for more information on other participating institutions across the country.

DNA:  FAQ and FYI Saturday, June 4, 2016 10:30 am – Noon

DNA research can be a very useful tool for finding not only your ancestors but also their living descendants, creating extraordinary opportunities for collaboration. So how does it work? Which test should you use? How do you interpret the test results? Join Atlanta History Center Senior Archivist Sue VerHoef for a program designed to help you use the latest in DNA technology. 

Tickets are $10 for Atlanta History Center members and $15 for non-members. Reservations are recommended. For more information, please call 404.814.4042.

Atlanta History Center Summer Camp 2016

  • June 6 – 10: My Town
  • June 13 – 17: Disasters!
  • June 20 – 24: Ancient Civilizations
  • June 27 – July 1: Dirty Jobs: 19thCentury Edition
  • July 11 – 15: Weird History
  • July 18 – 22: Turn of the Century
  • July 25 – 29: Hail to the Chief
  • August 1 – 5: The Olympic Games

History comes to life as Atlanta History Center summer campers explore the past through games, historic simulations, immersive experiences, performances, crafts, and hands-on activities throughout our exhibitions, historic houses, and Goizueta Gardens.  The museum is our playground!  With fun new themes each week, campers age 6-11 enjoy a variety of immersive camp experiences all summer long. 

For more information or to register, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/SummerCamp.

Margaret Mitchell House Summer Writing Camp 2016

  • June 6 – 10: Mystery in the City: The Con Game
  • June 13 – 17: Poetry and Performance
  • June 20 – 24: Extra! Extra! Write All About It!
  • June 27 – July 1: Write On: The Essentials
  • July 11 – 15: Mystery in the City: Haunts and Habitats
  • June 18 – 22: Sci-Fi and Fantasy
  • July 25 – 29: Fanfiction
  • August 1 – 5: Write On: The Essentials

Margaret Mitchell House writing camps provide an opportunity for 9-14 year olds to discover the power and excitement of writing while honing their skills in a fun, interactive environment.  With 10-15 participants per camp, each young author receives individual attention while learning how to create meaningful prose through a variety of techniques, like stream-of-consciousness writing, games, journaling, free verse poetry, and other forms. 

For more information, please visit MargaretMitchellHouse.com/SummerCamp.

Members-Only Event: Rosie the Riveters

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Time: TBA

Join us for a very special opportunity to participate in a panel discussion with real Rosie the Riveters! Members have the chance to ask questions, interact, and learn about the jobs that these women took on to ensure an Allied victory in World War II. Come hear their stories and create your own moment in history with this rare chance to meet, and thank, the women who provided an incredible service to our country. 

This program is free for Atlanta History Center members. Reservations are required. Please RSVP to Membership@AtlantaHistoryCenter.com or call 404.814.4101.

Juneteenth

Saturday, June 18, 201611:00 am – 4:00 pm

This two-day family program focuses on the appreciation and commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. Guests explore the themes of freedom and family history through activities, immersive museum theatre performances and crafts.

Free. For more information or to purchase admission tickets, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Family.

Support:Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

Juneteenth

Sunday, June 19, 2016

Noon – 4:00 pm

This two-day family program focuses on the appreciation and commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. Guests explore the themes of freedom and family history through activities, immersive museum theatre performances and crafts.

Free. For more information or to purchase admission tickets, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/Family.

 Support: Funding for this program is provided by the Fulton County Board of Commissioners under the guidance of Fulton County Arts Council.

Georgia Perennial Plant Association garden lecture series

Susan Varlamoff, Director of the Office of Environmental Sciences; University of Georgia: Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

7:00 pm

Location: Atlanta History Center

Susan Varlamoff promotes the environmental research, teaching, and extension programs for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences while facilitating collaboration with various entities to address pressing environmental issues. Sustainable Gardening for the Southeast is a vividly illustrated guide that offers simple techniques to help conserve water, reduce pollutants, and mitigate climate change while increasing biodiversity and attracting pollinators, and wildlife. Gardeners will be inspired and empowered to protect and enhance the local ecology as they cultivate a resilient landscape featuring native plants, colorful flowers and trees, and even organically grown fruits and vegetables. And for those who cherish their emerald lawns, she provides tips for keeping it green and environmentally sound.

Free, reservations are not required. Event starts at 7:00 pm with sign-in, light refreshments and a chance to mingle with fellow garden enthusiasts. Members often pass on gardening magazines and catalogs in an open swap. Lectures begin at 7:30 pm.

GENERAL INFORMATION

ABOUT THE ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER:

Founded in 1926, the Atlanta History Center is an all-inclusive, thirty-three-acre destination featuring the Atlanta History Museum, one of the nation’s largest history museums; two historic houses, the 1928 Swan House and the 1860 Smith Family Farm; the Centennial Olympic Games Museum; the Kenan Research Center; the Grand Overlook event space; Chick-Fil-A at the Coca-Cola Café, a museum shop, and the 22 acre Goizueta Gardens with paths and the kid-friendly Connor Brown Discovery Trail. 

In addition, the History Center operates the Margaret Mitchell House located in Midtown Atlanta. For information on Atlanta History Center offerings, hours of operation and admission call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

ADMISSION/HOURS:

The all-inclusive general admission allows access to the Atlanta History Center, including the Atlanta History Museum, the Centennial Olympic Games Museum at the Atlanta History Center, the 1860s Smith Family Farm, the 1928 Swan House, and the Goizueta Gardens.  Atlanta History Center admission including sales tax is $16.50 for adults, $13.00 for students 13+ and seniors 65+, $11.00 for youth 4 -12, and FREE for children 3 and under and Atlanta History Center members. The Atlanta History Center is open Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 5:30 pm and Sunday, Noon – 5:30 pm (ticket sales stop at 4:30 pm daily). For more information, please visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Special events facilities at the Kenan Research Center include the Woodruff Auditorium, a theater-style auditorium seating 400, and the Draper Members Room, perfect for a 120-person seated dinner. The Atlanta History Center is closed on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, the Atlanta History Center is open Noon – 5:30 pm on Martin Luther King Day, President’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day and Columbus Day. 

The Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center is open Wednesday – Saturday, 10 am – 5 pm. The Research Center is closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

Kenan Research Center at the Atlanta History Center

(Atlanta History Center, McElreath Hall)

Wednesday – Saturday; 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Kenan Research Center’s archives and special libraries collections comprise the research component of the Atlanta History Center’s study, exhibition, education, and public program activities. Housed in McElreath Hall on the Atlanta History Center’s Buckhead campus, the holdings contain resources for the study of Atlanta and Southern regional history and culture, including 34,000 volumes and 15,000 cubic feet of historic photographs, prints, maps and architectural drawings, business records, private papers, and documents, as well as 7,700 microfilm rolls of newspapers, Atlanta city directories and census records.  Admission to the Kenan Research Center is free to the public, attracting such researchers as genealogists, educators, scholars, historic preservationists, print and broadcast media, popular and academic authors and students from grade school to postgraduate studies. The Research Center staff answers more than 13,000 reference requests a year, assisting private individuals, nonprofit institutions and commercial firms.  Through the research facilities, individuals and media can purchase copies of historic photographs, prints, maps, and other archival images. Terminus, the Research Center public access catalog, can be accessed online at AtlantaHistoryCenter.com. Researchers can quickly find information due to the expanded space and division of rooms devoted to special interests including:

Decorative Arts: The Philip T. Shutze and Harvey M. Smith collections of design and decorative arts resources.

Genealogy: The genealogy and family history collections contain resources for tracing family history throughout Georgia and the South.

Military History: The Beverly M. DuBose Jr. and Thomas S. Dickey resources on the Civil War and military ordnance.

Southern Gardens: The Cherokee Garden Library composed of publications and rare books on gardening, botany, landscape design and agriculture.

GROUP TOURS:

Specialized guided tours and self-guided tours are available for groups of 20 or more adults or ten or more children. Enjoy special great picnic areas, on-campus dining from Chic-fil-A, bus accommodations and free parking. To schedule a group or school group tour, or for more information about school groups, please call 404.814.4062 or visit online at AtlantaHistoryCenter.com/GroupTours.