Oldest Pharaonic mummy from Museum of Florence finally has a face

Forensic techniques by international scientists has led to the facial reconstruction of the oldest preserved mummy in the Egyptian Museum of Florence.

The research, led by Dr Matteo Borrini, forensic anthropologist and principal lecturer at Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU), applied forensic techniques on the remains to reconstruct the features of the mummy known as ‘Kent.’   

The mummy was a high ranking person, a dignitary or a priest, of the XVIII dynasty (the same as Tutankhamun and Nefertiti). Until now only his name was known.  Dr Borrini devised the anatomy approximation from the skeletal structures of his skull and the reconstruction was revealed  at the International Congress of Egyptologists.

Dr Matteo Borrini commented:

"The research allows us to use the forensic investigation techniques for archaeological purposes to sketch the portrait of men who died millennia ago. The bust I made presents the scientific methodology in a language compatible with the needs of the museum and in harmony with the other artefacts on display.”

A CT scan of the mummy revealed details that ‘Kent’ was 50 years old when he died and allowed for an exact copy of his skull to be modelled so that the individual muscles of the face could be produced.  The bandages of the mummy were never removed. The procedure adopted is the "protocol of Manchester", a standardised investigative method that Dr Borrini has already used for other reconstructions both archaeological and during his work as a criminal expert.

Notes to editors

CT scan and data analysis: Dr Lapo Sali (University of Florence) and Dr Sara Savasta (Leone spa).

The hair, that could not be deduced from any anatomical remains, have been designed by Dr Borrini, in collaboration with Professor Donatella Lippi (University of Florence) and the Director of the Egyptian Museum Dr  Maria Cristina Guidotti, taking into account both the dynasty that the social status of the mummy.

The International Congress of Egyptologists is organised by the Superintendence for Cultural Heritage of Tuscany in collaboration with the University of Florence and the Cultural Association CAMNES.

Images available to download: on the media section (right hand side) of http://news.cision.com/liverpool-john-moores-university

Image credits - Dr Matteo Borrini

  •          The radiological team with also Donatella LIppi and Cristina Guidotti (right)
  •          The mummy during the CT scan
  •          The steps of the facial reconstruction and the final work

Interview contact details

Mail matteo.borrini@gmail.com

Mobile 00393478712283

About Us

Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) has over 180 years’ experience educating students in a wide range of disciplines, spanning the arts, humanities, education, health, science and technology and we offer a diverse range of undergraduate degrees, postgraduate taught programmes and research opportunities. Over 95% of research submitted to the Research Excellence Framework (REF) in 2014 was of international quality or higher, with more than 70% of impact activity rated internationally excellent or world-leading. We are one of the top performing new universities in the UK for Architecture and Built Environment, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, General Engineering, Physics and Sports-Related Studies. LJMU also continues to be one of the UK’s leading higher education institutions for our interaction with business and the community. We are currently ranked in the top 40 UK universities for staff and graduate start-up companies and in the top 20 for spin-off companies.

Media

Media

Quotes

The research allows us to use the forensic investigation techniques for archaeological purposes to sketch the portrait of men who died millennia ago. The bust I made presents the scientific methodology in a language compatible with the needs of the museum and in harmony with the other artefacts on display.
Dr Matteo Borrini