Study Shows Investigational COX-2 Specific Inhibitor Valdecoxib Causes Fewer Gastroduodenal Ulcers than the Non-Specific

Study Shows Investigational COX-2 Specific Inhibitor Valdecoxib Causes Fewer Gastroduodenal Ulcers than the Non-Specific NSAID Diclofenac for Rheumatoid Arthritis - Study Results Presented at EULAR Annual Meeting - Stockholm, Sweden (June 14, 2002) - While non-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used by arthritis patients to relieve pain and inflammation,1) their association with ulcers and other gastrointestinal (GI) side effects among patients taking them has been widely documented.2),3) Results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Annual European Congress of Rheumatology showed that the novel COX-2 specific inhibitor valdecoxib may provide pain relief comparable to the frequently prescribed non- specific NSAID diclofenac, but with significantly fewer endoscopically- detected gastroduodenal ulcers.4) The new study results presented by Frank McKenna, MD, Consultant, Rheumatology at Trafford General Hospital in Manchester, UK, showed that treatment with valdecoxib at 20 mg and 40 mg doses was comparable to the recommended daily dose of diclofenac in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 5) Additionally, the study found that the 20 mg and 40 mg doses of valdecoxib caused significantly fewer endoscopically-detected ulcers than diclofenac. 6),7) "The study results suggest that valdecoxib is significantly less likely to cause ulcers than diclofenac and may be an option for long-term treatment of the pain and inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis," said Dr. McKenna. Valdecoxib is currently being evaluated for marketing authorization in the European Union (EU). The drug has been approved for use in the United States for the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis (OA), adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and primary dysmenorrhea (painful menstrual cramping). Valdecoxib has also been approved in Mexico for acute pain, in Peru for acute pain and primary dysmenorrhea, and in Colombia for acute pain, OA and RA. The study was conducted among more than 700 adult RA patients in 26 countries.8),9) It was designed to compare the effectiveness and GI safety of valdecoxib 20 mg and 40 mg versus diclofenac at the recommended dose of 75 mg SR twice daily in treating the signs and symptoms of RA.10) Dr. McKenna reported that the study results demonstrated no significant difference in efficacy between either dose of valdecoxib and diclofenac according to standard measures of patients' pain relief and ability to function.11) However, the incidence of ulcers was significantly higher among patients treated with diclofenac than among those treated with either dose of valdecoxib.12) While the incidence of endoscopically- detected ulcers was 6 percent and 4 percent among patients treated with valdecoxib 20 mg and 40 mg respectively, 16 percent of patients treated with diclofenac developed an endoscopically-detected ulcer.13) Toxicity of NSAIDs More than 103 million Europeans have been diagnosed with some form of arthritis or rheumatic condition.1 NSAIDs are one of the most widely used classes of medications for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.14 There are more than 50 NSAIDs available worldwide,15), 16) the best known being aspirin, which has been used for more than a century.17) Widespread use of NSAIDs has made GI complications the most prevalent category of adverse drug reactions.18) Many patients at risk for GI complications have no warning signs.19) In one study, 40 percent of patients had no prior warning about bleeding in the upper GI tract related to NSAID treatment.20) In another, more than 80 percent of patients with serious NSAID-related GI complications reported no prior dyspepsia (indigestion).21) Additional Information The most common side effects reported during this study were dyspepsia, abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea, and were generally mild to moderate. The correlation between endoscopic findings and the incidence of clinically serious upper GI events has not been fully established. As with all NSAIDs, serious GI tract ulcerations can occur without warning symptoms. Physicians and patients should remain alert to the signs and symptoms of GI bleeding. Pharmacia Corporation (NYSE: PHA) is a top-tier global pharmaceutical company with a leading agricultural subsidiary. Pharmacia's innovative medicines and other products save lives and enhance health and wellness. Pharmacia's 59,000 people work together with many diverse stakeholders to bring these benefits to people around the world, and to create new health solutions for the future. Pfizer Inc (NYSE: PFE) discovers, develops, manufactures and markets leading prescription medicines for humans and animals, and many of the world's best-known consumer products. This press release contains forward-looking or anticipatory statements about the Company's business and financial performance plans which are based on the information currently available and the expectations currently deemed reasonable by the Company. However, because these forward-looking statements are subject to many risks, uncertainties and changes over time, including those referenced in the Company's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward- looking statements. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements as a result of new information or future developments. # # # Europe Media U.S. Media Contact Contact Sabeena Ahmad Stephanie Fagan Pharmacia Pharmacia Corporation Corporation Mobile: +41 079 Mobile: +908 468 0700 432-2422 _______________________________ 1) Source 4: 2002 Drug Guide, Arthritis Foundation, Adapted from Arthritis Today, www.arthritis.org/conditions/drugguide/nsaids_about.asp 2) Source 11: Simon LS, Hotoum HT, Bittman RM, Archambault WT, Polisson RP, "Risk Factors for Serious Nonsteroidal-induced Gastrointestinal Complications: Regression Analysis of the MUCOSA Trial," Fam Med 1996:28:204-10 3) Source 10: Wolf M, Lichtenstein D, Singh G, "Medical Progress: Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs (Review Article), "The New England Journal of Medicine, June 17, 1999;340:24, p.1888-1899. 4) Source 3: McKenna F, et al. "Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 5) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 6) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 7) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 8) Source 4: "Final Report for a Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Parallel Group Study to Compare Valdecoxib 20 mg Once Daily, Valdecoxib 40 mg Once Daily, and Diclofenac 75 mg SR Twice Daily for Antiarthritic Efficacy and Gastrointestinal Safety and Tolerability in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis," Protocol Number I91-99-02-062, page 3. 9) Source 4: "Final Report for a Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Parallel Group Study to Compare Valdecoxib 20 mg Once Daily, Valdecoxib 40 mg Once Daily, and Diclofenac 75 mg SR Twice Daily for Antiarthritic Efficacy and Gastrointestinal Safety and Tolerability in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis," Protocol Number I91-99-02-062, page 3. 10) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 11) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 12) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 13) Source 3: McKenna F,"Valdecoxib, a Potent COX-2 Specific Inhibitor, is as Effective as Diclofenac in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Has a Lower Incidence of Gastroduodenal Ulcers," Abstract to be presented at EULAR 2002. 14) Source 5: "2002 Drug Guide." Arthritis Foundation 15) Source 9: Physician's Desk Reference. 55th Edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Co; 2001. 16) Source 9: Physician's Desk Reference. 55th Edition. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Co; 2001. 17) Source 11: Wolf M, Lichtenstein D, Singh G. "Medical Progress: Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs (Review Article)," The New England Journal of Medicine, Jun 17 , 1999; 340:24,p. 1888-1899. 18) Source 6: Singh G. "NSAID-Induced GI Complications: The ARAMIS Perspective-1997." J Rheumatol. 1998:25 Suppl. 51:8-16. 19) Source 7: Singh G, Triadafilopoulus G. "Epidemiology of NSAID-induced GI complications." J Rheumatol. 1999;26:18-24. P. 20) Source 8: Laszlo A, Kelly JP, Kaufman DE et al. Clinical aspects of upper gastrointestinal bleeding associated with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Am J Gastroenterol 1998;93(5):721-5. 21) Source 7: Singh G, Triadafilopoulos G. Epidemiology of NSAID induced gastrointestinal complications. J Rheumatol 1999;26 Suppl 56:18-24. ------------------------------------------------------------ This information was brought to you by Waymaker http://www.waymaker.net The following files are available for download: http://www.waymaker.net/bitonline/2002/06/13/20020613BIT01380/wkr0001.doc http://www.waymaker.net/bitonline/2002/06/13/20020613BIT01380/wkr0002.pdf