Have Acid Reflux? Skip “Balanced” Meals

Repeated exposure to stomach acid can cause the sphincter muscle at the top of the stomach to weaken, allowing acid to backwash into the esophagus. 

According to the American Gastroenterology Association, 60 million Americans say they suffer from heartburn at least once a month and 25 million say they experience symptoms of acid reflux daily. This number has risen by 10 million over the last decade. More than 40% of the population now uses antacids more than once a week; prescription and over-the-counter remedies are costing billions of dollars annually.

Many experts think that the problem is age-related and often unavoidable; others point to big meals and chronic overeating. Repeated exposure to stomach acid can cause the sphincter muscle at the top of the stomach to weaken, allowing acid to backwash into the esophagus. Big meals create stomach pressure, exacerbating the problem. The esophagus wasn’t designed to handle this acid, and the damage caused often results in a condition called Barrett’s esophagus, which causes cell changes. Left untreated, it can contribute to the development of stomach cancer.

“We were never meant to eat the ‘balanced’ meals often recommended by ‘experts,’” say boomer generation health experts Dian Griesel, Ph.D., and Tom Griesel, authors of the new book TurboCharged: Accelerate Your Fat Burning Metabolism, Get Lean Fast and Leave Diet and Exercise Rules in the Dust (April 2011, BSH). “Balanced meals might look good in theory, but they are not natural and are in fact the cause of acid reflux.” TurboCharged® is a groundbreaking 8-Step program that defies common weight-loss theories. It successfully delivers body-defining rapid fat loss, accelerates metabolism, and improves health and odds of longevity without gimmicks, supplements or special equipment.

“Our digestive system will try to handle anything we eat, but combining macronutrients like starchy carbohydrates with proteins creates a situation our stomachs really can’t handle,” add the Griesels. “This is because starches and proteins require entirely different mediums for proper digestion. Putting them both in the stomach at the same time is asking for trouble. Proteins require acid for digestion. Starches require an alkaline environment. Eat them separately and there is no problem. Refined, processed and packaged foods are especially problematic because they are made with these very same unnatural heartburn-causing combinations.”

Related links:

http://www.facebook.com/turbochargedUS

http://twitter.com/#!/diangriesel.

Janet Vasquez, Director of Corporate Communications

The Investor Relations Group

11 Stone Street, 3rd floor

New York, NY 10004

212-825-3210

jvasquez@Investorrelationsgroup.com

Business School of Happiness

Washington Depot, CT

http://www.businessschoolofhappiness.com

http://www.turbocharged.us.com

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We were never meant to eat the ‘balanced’ meals often recommended by ‘experts,’
Dian Griesel