Health Needs to Be Top Priority for Parents With Busy Schedules, Say Experts

Our children need us to be there for them, and putting your own health on the back burner may be detrimental to those who count on you as a parent says nutritionist, Dr. Dian Griesel.

This year has been a successful one for Emmy Award-winning actress and comedian Melissa McCarthy. But one thing continues to be a constant struggle for the star of Mike & Molly and Bridesmaids: her weight. 

“I’ve been up and down,” McCarthy told Anderson Cooper during an appearance on Cooper’s daytime talk show, Anderson. “I’ve been much thinner since my second baby. I’m still working on it. It’s a work in progress.”  McCarthy says she’d love to be more svelte but recognizes the effort required. 

“I hope I wake up at, like, 94 pounds,” she quips. “But I don’t think that’s going to happen.”  Her main focus is her family, rather than conforming to Hollywood’s typical beauty standards.  “There’s so many other things to worry about,” McCarthy says. “I still worry about it, but I think, my kids are healthy, I’ve got a great husband, and I go to work every day and do what I want. I’ll keep working on [my body],” she adds. “I just can’t put any time to worrying about it.”

“What Melissa said resonates with a lot of parents, based on the applause she received from Anderson’s audience—but unfortunately, that line thinking may not be best for our children,” say Dian Griesel, Ph.D., and Tom Griesel, authors of the new book TurboCharged: Accelerate Your Fat Burning Metabolism, Get Lean Fast and Leave Diet and Exercise Rules in the Dust (April 2011, BSH). “Our children need us to be there for them, and putting your own health on the back burner may be detrimental to those who count on you as a parent.”

Dian, who herself is a mother of two, adds, “When your ‘normal’ routine changes—as in Melissa’s case with her successful film and TV career—it’s time to review your priorities. No one expects to be 96 pounds, but getting lean, fit and staying healthy is all about consistency,” Dian clarifies. “So your top priority is formulating a routine you can maintain. Your plan needs to fit into your schedule so that it doesn’t stop when things get crazy. Everyday life is filled with potential roadblocks.”

Tom adds, “One of your top priorities should be to avoid mindless eating and inactivity—the two major culprits in weight gain. Even if you diet and exercise regularly, if you suddenly stop exercising but keep eating the same amount or start eating junk or fast foods, your health and fitness will deteriorate.”

The key to success, say the Griesels, is to incorporate foods, activities and exercise into your day that don’t require too much time away from your family obligations or any special preparation, location or equipment.

Their TurboCharged suggestions for parents include: Don’t eat unless you’re actually hungry. Focus on fresh fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds and small amounts of quality animal protein. Eliminate refined foods, processed foods and sweeteners, particularly high-fructose corn syrup. Avoid fast food. Prepare your own meals and keep them simple. Stay on your feet as much as possible. Incorporate short exercise sessions into your day. Take time daily to relax, de-stress and focus on goals.

TurboCharged® is a groundbreaking 8-Step program that defies common weight-loss theories. It successfully delivers body-defining rapid fat loss, accelerates metabolism, and improves health and odds of longevity without gimmicks, supplements or special equipment.

For more information, log on www.turbocharged.us.com.

Related links:

http://turbocharged.us.com/about-2/learn-more/

http://www.facebook.com/turbochargedUS

http://twitter.com/#!/diangriesel

Janet Vasquez, Director of Corporate Communications

The Investor Relations Group

11 Stone Street, 3rd floor

New York, NY 10004

212-825-3210

jvasquez@Investorrelationsgroup.com

Business School of Happiness

Washington Depot, CT

http://www.businessschoolofhappiness.com

http://www.turbocharged.us.com

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Quotes

Our children need us to be there for them, and putting your own health on the back burner may be detrimental to those who count on you as a parent.”
Dian Griesel, Ph.D.