Insplorion, Chalmers and PowerCell develop the world's fastest hydrogen sensor with funding from the Swedish Energy Agency

The Swedish Energy Agency awards the project "Nano-Plasmonic ultra-fast H2 sensor for a safe hydrogen economy" MSEK 3.8. Within the project, a hydrogen sensor will be developed that will enable faster conversion to hydrogen as an alternative to fossil energy by increasing safety and optimizing the operation of fuel cells. In the project, the hydrogen sensor chip from Chalmers will be integrated with Insplorion's own developed sensor platform and adapted to the requirements and needs of PowerCell, global leader within fuel cell technology. The project will run for 24 months with expected start in January 2020.

The project is based on a technical breakthrough recently published in the prestigious journal Nature Materials by co-applicant Prof. Christoph Langhammer's research group at Chalmers University of Technology.

The aim of the project is to demonstrate how these sensors can be used in two different but equally important applications, which place different demands on the sensor:
• to improve the understanding and thus the efficiency of fuel cells in the development stage and long term be able to optimize operation.
• to operate within safety around various hydrogen gas systems, such as detection of leaks during transport and storage of hydrogen, as well as when operating fuel cells.

We need access to sensors that combine short response time with high measurement accuracy, compact format and at the right cost. Sensors based on Insplorion's technology could meet all the requirements and thus also contribute to increased efficiency and reliability of our fuel cell systems", comments Lisa Kylhammar, Manager Stack Development at PowerCell.

The function of the sensor will be demonstrated in a real environment. What most distinguishes this sensor from existing ones on the market is its rapid response time. A fast response time is of great importance both for sensors that will work for safety applications and for optimizing fuel cells.

The hydrogen sensor has been an opportunity within Insplorion since the company was founded. It's great to see that the research that has been ongoing within Christoph's group now has had great breakthroughs which can coincide with both our gas platform development and the maturing market for hydrogen", says Patrik Dahlqvist, CEO of Insplorion.

Questions are answered by:
Patrik Dahlqvist, CEO Insplorion AB, +46 723 62 32 61 or patrik.dahlqvist@insplorion.com

Insplorion AB (publ)
Sahlgrenska Science Park
Medicinaregatan 8A                
SE-413 90 GÖTEBORG
SWEDEN

+46 31 380 26 95
info@insplorion.com
www.insplorion.com

This information is insider information that Insplorion AB (publ) is obliged to make public pursuant to the EU Market Abuse Regulation. The information was published December 4, 2019.

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Insplorion AB, with its disruptive sensor platform NanoPlasmonic Sensing (NPS), operates within three fields. Battery sensors, air quality sensors and research instruments. Our sensor technology optimizes battery control and usage and enables air quality sensors at home, in cars and in public environment, thanks to the small size, durability and cost efficiency at volume production. Our instruments give scientists around the world nanometer sensitive real time data of surface processes in fields like catalysis, material- and life science.

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The hydrogen sensor has been an opportunity within Insplorion since the company was founded. It's great to see that the research that has been ongoing within Christoph's group now has had great breakthroughs which can coincide with both our gas platform development and the maturing market for hydrogen.
Patrik Dahlqvist, Insplorion
We need access to sensors that combine short response time with high measurement accuracy, compact format and at the right cost. Sensors based on Insplorion's technology could meet all the requirements and thus also contribute to increased efficiency and reliability of our fuel cell systems.
Lisa Kylhammar, Powercwll