Greater knowledge about the spruce bark beetle

Why does damage caused by spruce bark beetle increase during extremely hot and dry summers? How can growth in young and middle-aged forest be strengthened? These are a few of the questions for which researchers received grants to conduct further studies.

At its December 2018 meeting, Sodra’s Foundation for Research, Development and Education awarded SEK 5.4 million to various research projects. A total of SEK 12 million was awarded in 2018.

“Damage caused by spruce bark beetles is a major problem for forestry. We have now granted funds to research projects that will deepen our knowledge, and will eventually mean we are better placed to develop more effective measures,” said Göran Örlander, Chairman of Södra Research Foundation.

The Södra Foundation for Research, Development and Education has since its start in 1995 granted SEK 180 million to promote research and development that is of significance to forestry, and forest industry operations, in Southern Sweden.

“Greater use of wood and forest products forms a key component in the transition to a more sustainable society. We are therefore focusing on enhancing knowledge about forest growth, which is aligned with Sodra’s sustainability targets,” said Göran Örlander.

According to Södra’s sustainability targets, the annual rate of forest growth on Södra members’ estates will be 20 percent higher in 2050 compared with 2015.

“It is high time that production issues are moved to the top of the agenda in climate discussions,” said Göran Örlander.

Projects awarded funding are: 

  1. Improved control of thinning work to enhance growth in young and middle-aged forest. Johan Möller, the Forestry Research Institute of Swede
  2. Why does the risk of damage caused by spruce bark beetle increase during extremely hot and dry summers? Martin Schroeder, the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
  3. From insecticides to mechanical protection against pine weevil – implications for plant survival and growth. Karin Hjelm, the Forestry Research Institute of Sweden
  4. Follow-up of hybrid aspen and poplar planted after Cyclone Gudrun. Nils Fahlvik, the Forestry Research Institute of Sweden
  5. Mechanical root pulling – the long-term economic potential. Back Tomas Ersson, the Swedish University of Agricultural Science
  6. Forest fertilisation – establishment of growth trials in spruce stands in southern Sweden – Staffan Jacobson, the Forestry Research Institute of Sweden

For more information, please contact:
Göran Örlander, Chairman of the Södra Research Foundation and forestry strategist at Södra
Tel: 070 – 590 94 83
E-mail: goran.orlander@sodra.com

Södra’s Pressroom
Tel: +46 (0)470-890 90
E-mail:press@sodra.com

Södra was founded in 1938 and is the largest forest-owner association in Sweden, with a membership of close to 52,000 forest owners. We engage in modern and responsible forestry, and operate state-of-the-art mills in which we process our raw material. Net sales in 2017 were 20.5 SEK billion and there were 3,400 employees. Through value-generating relationships and a long-term approach, Södra is leading the way for the future of sustainable forestry.

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Södra was founded in 1938 and is the largest forest-owner association in Sweden, with a membership of close to 52,000 forest owners. Södra is also an international forest industry Group, with 3,400 employees around the world. Net sales in 2017 were 20.5 SEK billion. Balancing production efficiency with nature conservation guides everything that we do. We produce timber, interior wood products, pulp for paper and textiles, and green energy. We use every part of the tree, and are always looking to develop new products from this fantastic, renewable raw material. Södra is a world-leading producer of market pulp and also owns one of the largest sawmill operations in Europe. Through value-generating relationships and a long-term approach, Södra is leading the way for the future of sustainable forestry.

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